Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy for osteoporosis promotes osteogenesis​​​ or bone regeneration and has been shown to stimulate osteoblast activity and improve bone mineralization. Read our research review on PEMF therapy for Osteoporosis to see how PEMF therapy can affect the healing of this musculoskeletal disease.

PEMf therapy for osteoporosis treatment bone health antiaging

Osteoporosis and conventional treatments

Osteoporosis is a disease that leads to an increased risk of skeletal fractures due to a reduction in the volume of bone mass. It has been more explicitly defined as a disease characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural degradation of bone tissue, resulting in increased bone fragility and thus increased risk of fracture​1​.

Statistics show that there are thousands of fractures per year due to this disease. Fifty percent of these fractures are extremely debilitating spinal fractures. In those with osteoporosis, a fracture can be caused by even a minor fall or during routine activities, such as twisting and bending. More than 700,000 vertebral body compression fractures occur per year in the United States. To give you a better idea of how common this is, osteoporosis-related fractures happen every three seconds. 

Osteoporosis also seems to affect elderly women more and leads to numerous fractures in different parts of the body due to fragile bones. One in every third woman is affected, whereas only one in every fifth man is affected. Osteoporosis patients often experience pain and loss of mobility.  Because of the risks of osteoporosis, now more than ever, women are encouraged to start bone density testing at age 50.

Osteopenia, which precedes osteoporosis, is a milder state of bone loss. Fracture risk is increased in osteopenia as well but more importantly it very frequently progresses to osteoporosis. Once bone is lost it is very hard to recover. So, it is best to intervene with osteopenia where improved bone density results will be seen better and faster.

This is eye opening for those who do not recognize the various aspects of bone health. Hormones can severely affect female bone formation, and eventually estrogen can become too high, leading to a rapid onset of the disease​2​.

Although most believe that this disease is related to calcium deficiency, it is not the only cause of osteoporosis. There are many risk factors that can exacerbate the disease, including diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. Bone density begins to decline at the age of 30 as bone loss starts due to ageing​2​.

Until now, most believed that their only option after a bone density test confirming osteoporosis was to be put on Osteoporosis medications, which can have several significant side-effects. Now we know, natural alternative therapies combined with PEMF therapy have shown positive results.

While bone supplements, drugs and various types of massage therapies are the most common treatment for osteoporosis, pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy should also be considered.

What is PEMF therapy and how is it better?

PEMF therapy uses pulsating magnetic fields to stimulate the mitochondria in the cells to produce more energy, thus enhancing the natural recovery and regeneration processes.

PEMF therapy was recognized in the late 1970s to heal non-union fractures, and has since been shown to have regenerative effects on bones and cartilages​3​.

Since PEMF therapy is able to work on cells, blood circulation​4​ and increase bone density over time, it could be used as an alternative approach to using drugs that may cause negative side effects. Studies have not observed any side effects​5​ even with long-term use of PEMF or TMS (PEMF applied to brain) stimulation.

Most medications, bone supplements or therapies will only address or overload the system with supplementation and chemicals attempting to improve bone mass. PEMF is a unique, safe and effective approach as it promises true longevity effects due to cellular regeneration occurring naturally from an improved biochemical balance. Even hormonal imbalances​6​ find positive effects from PEMF application as well.

How PEMF therapy works for Osteoporosis

PEMF therapy research has increased significantly in recent years and has been found helpful for osteoporosis and osteopenia. Clinical studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of PEMF in primary and secondary osteoporosis.

PEMF therapy is known to repair cells​7,8​, bones, joints and other tissues​3,9​. Similarly, scientific research has already shown that PEMF promotes cartilage repair, including articular cartilage​11​ that cannot regenerate or repair itself.

PEMF promotes osteogenesis​10​ or bone regeneration and has been shown to stimulate osteoblast activity and improve bone mineralization in cases of osteoporosis.

Bone health specialists such as Chiropractors, orthopedists, massage therapists and even naturopaths are increasingly advising their patients about the value of PEMF. Although many practitioners offer this therapy in their office, this approach cannot benefit osteopenia/osteoporosis long term. Bone loss is continuous, happening all day every day. Individuals who want to achieve the benefits of osteoporosis healing will need daily PEMF therapy.

The effect of PEMF on biochemical markers of bone metabolism has confirmed that PEMF therapy promotes bone formation, which may explain the why PEMF therapy is beneficial for those suffering with osteoporosis​11​.

In conclusion, PEMF therapy should greatly reduce pain and improve the osteoporosis issues. With good nutritional support, exercise and proper hormone balancing, it should provide relief from the disease.

Disclaimer: We do not claim that our products can be used to treat Osteoporosis or any other medical conditions.

PEMF therapy for osteoporosis research studies

  1. 1.
    Whitfield J. What Is Osteoporosis? In: Madame Curie Bioscience Database [Internet]. Austin (TX), United States: Landes Bioscience; 2013:1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK6278/.
  2. 2.
    Cui J, Shen Y, Li R. Estrogen synthesis and signaling pathways during aging: from periphery to brain. Trends Mol Med. 2013;19(3):197-209. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23348042.
  3. 3.
    Yuan J, Xin F, Jiang W. Underlying Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Applications of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields in Bone Repair. Cell Physiol Biochem. 2018:1581-1594. doi:10.1159/000489206
  4. 4.
    Rikk J, Finn K, Liziczai I, Radák Z, Bori Z, Ihász F. Influence of pulsing electromagnetic field therapy on resting blood pressure in aging adults. Electromagn Biol Med. 2013;32(2):165-172. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23675619.
  5. 5.
    Anderson B, Mishory A, Nahas Z, et al. Tolerability and safety of high daily doses of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy young men. J ECT. 2006;22(1):49-53. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16633208.
  6. 6.
    Szuba M, O’Reardon J, Rai A, et al. Acute mood and thyroid stimulating hormone effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression. Biol Psychiatry. 2001;50(1):22-27. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11457420.
  7. 7.
    Suryani L, Too J, Hassanbhai A, et al. Effects of Electromagnetic Field on Proliferation, Differentiation, and Mineralization of MC3T3 Cells. Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2019;25(2):114-125. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30661463.
  8. 8.
    Aragona S, Mereghetti G, Lotti J, Vosa A, Lotti T, Canavesi E. Electromagnetic field in control tissue regeneration, pelvic pain, neuro-inflammation and modulation of non-neuronal cells. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2017;31(2 Suppl. 2):219-225. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28702986.
  9. 9.
    Iwasa K, Reddi A. Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields and Tissue Engineering of the Joints. Tissue Eng Part B Rev. 2018;24(2):144-154. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29020880.
  10. 10.
    Wu S, Yu Q, Lai A, Tian J. Pulsed electromagnetic field induces Ca<sup>2+</sup>-dependent osteoblastogenesis in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells through the Wnt-Ca<sup>2+</sup>/Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2018;503(2):715-721. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29909008.
  11. 11.
    Huang L, He H, He C, Chen J, Yang L. Clinical update of pulsed electromagnetic fields on osteoporosis. Chin Med J (Engl). 2008;121(20):2095-2099. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19080282.